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Lat

QUICK FACTS
Date of Birth March 5, 1951
Place of Birth Kota Bharu
Country Malaysia
Religion Not Available
Age 70 years, 8 months, 10 days
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Lat net worth, birthday, age, height, weight, wiki, fact 2020-21! In this article, we will discover how old is Lat? Who is Lat dating now & how much money does Lat have?

SHORT PROFILE
Father Not Available
Mother Not Available
Siblings Not Available
Spouse Not Known
Children(s) Not Available

Lat Biography

Lat is a famous Cartoonist, who was born on March 5, 1951 in Malaysia. According to Astrologers, Lat's zodiac sign is Pisces.

Malaysian society used to look down on cartoonists, assuming that those who practised the trade were intellectually inferior to writers, or were lesser artists; Lat was not the only cartoonist to be paid with movie tickets in the 1950s; Rejabhad once received one ticket for ten cartoons, and many others were likewise recompensed, or were paid very little money. Despite the lowly reputation of his profession at that time, Lat is very proud of his choice of career; he once took umbrage with an acquaintance’s girlfriend for her presumption that the words and ideas in his cartoons were not his own. Drawing cartoons is more than a career to him:

Music has played a crucial part in Lat’s life since his youth; he revealed in an interview that listening to songs such as Peggy March’s “I Will Follow Him” and Paul & Paula’s “Hey Paula” helped him learn English. Listening to music had also become an important ritual in his work, providing him with inspiration in his art. When he sketches “fashionable girls”, he puts on Paul McCartney’s tracks, and switches to Indonesian gamelan when he needs to draw intricate details. He enjoys pop music, particularly rock music of the 1950s and 60s, listening to The Beatles, Bob Dylan, and Elvis Presley. Lat is also partial to country music, and to singers such as Hank Williams and Roy Rogers because he finds their tunes “humble”. His enjoyment of music is more than a passive interest; he is proficient with the guitar and piano, and can play them by ear.

Ethnicity, religion & political views

Many peoples want to know what is Lat ethnicity, nationality, Ancestry & Race? Let's check it out! As per public resource, IMDb & Wikipedia, Lat's ethnicity is Not Known. We will update Lat's religion & political views in this article. Please check the article again after few days.

The early influences on his art style were from the West. Like most of the Malaysian children in the 1950s, Lat watched Hanna-Barbera cartoons (The Flintstones and The Jetsons) on television and read imported British comics, such as The Dandy and The Beano. He studied them and used their styles and themes in his early doodles. After the foreign influences in his works were noticed by a family friend, Lat was advised by his father to observe and draw upon ideas from their surroundings instead. Heeding the advice, the young cartoonist intimated himself with local happenings. Tiga Sekawan was conceived as a humorous crime-fighting story of a local flavour. Keluarga Si Mamat and its protagonist were named after his youngest brother Mamat, its stories based on Lat’s observations of his fellow villagers and schoolmates. The inspiration for his cartoons about Bersunat came about when he was on assignment at a hospital. As he was taking breaks from investigating the dead victims of crime brought to the morgue, Lat chanced upon the circumcisions performed by the hospital on ethnic Malay boys. He found their experiences clinical, devoid of the elaborate and personal ceremonies that celebrated his own rite to manhood in the village. Lat felt compelled to illustrate the differences between life in his kampung and the city.

Lat Net Worth

Lat is one of the richest Cartoonist & listed on most popular Cartoonist. According to our analysis, Wikipedia, Forbes & Business Insider, Lat net worth is approximately $1.5 Million.

Lat Net Worth & Salary
Net Worth $1.5 Million
Salary Under Review
Source of Income Cartoonist
Cars Not Available
House Living in own house.

The early influences on his art style were from the West. Like most of the Malaysian children in the 1950s, Lat watched Hanna-Barbera cartoons (The Flintstones and The Jetsons) on television and read imported British comics, such as The Dandy and The Beano. He studied them and used their styles and themes in his early doodles. After the foreign influences in his works were noticed by a family friend, Lat was advised by his father to observe and draw upon ideas from their surroundings instead. Heeding the advice, the young cartoonist intimated himself with local happenings. Tiga Sekawan was conceived as a humorous crime-fighting story of a local flavour. Keluarga Si Mamat and its protagonist were named after his youngest brother Mamat, its stories based on Lat’s observations of his fellow villagers and schoolmates. The inspiration for his cartoons about Bersunat came about when he was on assignment at a hospital. As he was taking breaks from investigating the dead victims of crime brought to the morgue, Lat chanced upon the circumcisions performed by the hospital on ethnic Malay boys. He found their experiences clinical, devoid of the elaborate and personal ceremonies that celebrated his own rite to manhood in the village. Lat felt compelled to illustrate the differences between life in his kampung and the city.

Mohammad Nor Khalid was born on 5 March 1951 in a kampung (village) in Gopeng, Perak, Malaysia. His father was a government clerk with the Malaysian Armed Forces, and his mother a housewife. Khalid was a stocky boy with a cherubic face, which led his family to nickname him bulat (round). His friends shortened it to “Lat”; it became the name by which he was more commonly known in his kampung and later in the world. Lat was the eldest child in his family, and he often played in the jungles, plantations, and tin mines with his friends. Their toys were usually improvised from everyday sundries and items of nature. Lat liked to doodle with materials provided by his parents, and his other forms of recreation were reading comics and watching television; Lat idolised local cartoonist Raja Hamzah, who was popular with his tales of swashbuckling Malay heroes. Malaysian art critic and historian Redza Piyadasa believes Lat’s early years in the kampung ingrained the cartoonist with pride in his kampung roots and a “peculiarly Malay” outlook—”full of […] gentleness and refinement”.

Lat Height

Lat's height Not available right now. weight Not Known & body measurements will update soon.
Lat Height & Body Stats
Height Unknown
Weight Not Known
Body Measurements Under Review
Eye Color Not Available
Hair Color Not Available
Feet/Shoe Size Not Available

Datuk Mohammad Nor bin Mohammad Khalid (Jawi: محمد نور بن محمد خالد ‎; born 5 March 1951), more commonly known as Lat, is a Malaysian cartoonist. Winner of the Fukuoka Asian Culture Prize in 2002, Lat has published more than 20 volumes of cartoons since he was 13 years old. His works mostly illustrate Malaysia’s social and political scenes, portraying them in a comedic light without bias. Lat’s best known work is The Kampung Boy (1979), which is published in several countries across the world. In 1994, the Sultan of Perak bestowed the honorific title of datuk on Lat, in recognition of the cartoonist’s work in helping to promote social harmony and understanding through his cartoons. Lat also works for the government to improve trance genre, and to improve the city’s social security.

Who is Lat dating?

According to our records, Lat is possibily single & has not been previously engaged. As of June 2021, Lat’s is not dating anyone.

Relationships Record: We have no records of past relationships for Lat. You may help us to build the dating records for Lat!

At the age of nine, Lat began to supplement his family’s income through his artistic skills, by drawing comics and selling them to his friends. Four years later, in 1964, the young cartoonist achieved his first published work: a local movie magazine—Majallah Filem—printed his comic strips, paying him with movie tickets. Lat’s first comic book publication, Tiga Sekawan (Three Friends Catch a Thief), was published by Sinaran Brothers that year. The company had accepted Lat’s submission, mistaking him for an adult and paying him 25 Malaysian ringgits (RM) for a story about three friends who band together to catch thieves. In 1968, at the age of 17, Lat started penning Keluarga Si Mamat (Mamat’ s Family), a comic strip for Berita Minggu (the Sunday edition of Berita Harian). The series ran in the paper every week for 26 years. Although still a schoolboy, Lat was earning a monthly income of RM100, a large sum in those days, from his cartoons. His education finished two years later at the end of Form 5; his Third Grade in the Senior Cambridge examinations was not enough for him to advance to Form 6. Graduating with an education equivalent to that of high school, Lat started looking for a job and had his sights set on becoming an illustrator.

Facts & Trivia

Ranked on the list of most popular Cartoonist. Also ranked in the elit list of famous celebrity born in Malaysia. Lat celebrates birthday on March 5 of every year.

Lat’s style has been described as reflective of his early influences, The Beano and The Dandy. He has, however, come into his own way of illustration, drawing the common man on the streets with bold strokes in pen and ink. A trademark of his Malay characters is their three-loop noses. Lat paid attention to family life and children because of his idolisation of Raja Hamzah, a senior cartoonist who was also popular in the 1960s with his comics about swashbuckling heroes. Rejabhad, a well-respected cartoonist, was Lat’s mentor, and imbued the junior cartoonist with a preference to be sensitive to the subjects of his works. Lat’s attention to details gained him popularity, endearing his works to the masses who find them believable and unbiased.

The effects of Lat’s works were not confined to the artistic sector. In the period before his debut, Malaysian cartoonists supported calls for national unity. The characters in a cartoon were often of one race, and negative focus on the foibles of particular races or cultures worked its way into the mainstream. Such cartoons did not help to soothe racial tensions that were simmering then. The situation erupted with the racial riots of 1969, and for several years after these incidents relationships among the races were raw and fragile. According to Redza, Lat soothed the nation’s racial woes with his works. Drawing members of various races in his crowd scenes and showing their interactions with one another, Lat portrayed Malaysians in a gentle and unbiased comic manner. Redza pointed out although one may argue that Lat was forced into the role of racial and cultural mediator (because of his employment with his country’s “leading English-language newspaper serving a multi-racial readership”), he possessed the necessary qualities—intimate knowledge of various races and culture—to succeed in the job. Lat’s fans recognised the trademark of his oeuvre as “a safe and nice humour that made everyone feel good and nostalgic by appealing to their benevolent sides rather than by poking at their bad sides”. It proved to be a successful formula; more than 850,000 copies of his books were sold in the twelve years after the first compilation of his editorial cartoons went on sale in 1977. The comfort that readers sought from his works was such that when in September 2008 Lat deviated from his usual style, to draw a cartoon about racially charged politicking in his country, it shocked journalist Kalimullah Hassan. She found the illustration of a group of Malaysians huddled under an umbrella, taking shelter from a rain of xenophobic phrases, full of profound sadness.

At the time that Lat started drawing for the New Straits Times, local political cartoonists were gentle in their treatment of Malaysian politicians; the politicians’ features were recreated faithfully and criticisms were voiced in the form of subtle poems. Lat, however, pushed the boundaries; although he portrayed the politicians with dignity, he exaggerated notable features of their appearances and traits. Lat recalled that in 1974, he was told to change one of his works, which portrayed Malaysian Prime Minister Abdul Razak from the back. Lee refused to print the work unchanged, and pointedly asked the cartoonist “You want to go to jail?!” In 1975, however, Lat’s next attempt at a political cartoon won Lee’s approval. The satire featured a caricature of Razak’s successor—Hussein Onn—on the back of a camel, travelling back to Kuala Lumpur from Saudi Arabia; its punchline was Hussein’s hailing of his mount to slow down after reading news that a pay raise for the civil service would be enacted on his return.

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